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Bowel cancer screening

Bowel screening is a straightforward and simple process to identify whether or not you have bowel cancer. It aims to spot the signs early so that treatment can be offered quickly. If caught early, bowel cancer is highly treatable and curable.

Bowel cancer is a very common cancer, and as such, the the NHS offers screening every two years for people aged 60-74.

Privately, Mr Kukreja is able to offer screening to all patients aged 18+. Whilst bowel cancer is less common in younger people, it does happen, and so some patients will choose to undergo regular screening from a younger age than when the NHS programme begins.

Fortunately, the test is simple and straightforward to carry out. You’ll also benefit from Mr Kukreja’s expertise and advice as part of the service.

Bowel cancer is a very common cancer, and as such, the the NHS offers screening every two years for people aged 60-74.

Privately, Mr Kukreja is able to offer screening to all patients aged 18+. Whilst bowel cancer is less common in younger people, it does happen, and so some patients will choose to undergo regular screening from a younger age than when the NHS programme begins.

Fortunately, the test is simple and straightforward to carry out. You’ll also benefit from Mr Kukreja’s expertise and advice as part of the service.

Frequently asked questions

about bowel cancer screening

Who can have private bowel screening?

Mr Kukreja can offer bowel screening privately to anyone over the age of 18. 

What does the bowel screening test involve?

Mr Kukreja uses a test called a Faecal Immunochemical test (FIT). This is a highly sensitive test that checks for small amounts of blood in your stool. 

What happens if you find a positive result?

A positive FIT test does not mean you have bowel cancer. However, to be sure, Mr Kukreja will usually offer patients a colonoscopy to check for anything causing the blood in your stool.